EP119: Save Time and Streamline your Communication with Aviva IQ

EP119: Save Time and Streamline your Communication with Aviva IQ


As your calendar fills up with bookings the constant emails to past and future guests can become overwhelming.

Deborah and Josh Yuster join Jasper on this week’s episode to talk about their startup that solves this problem. Aviva IQ allows hosts to automate personalized messages, eliminating over 80% of manual messaging from host to guest!

Jasper has been using this service for a few weeks now and he was so impressed by the service he brought the co-founders on to talk about it.

Some of the topics covered

Backgrounds of Co-Founders

The genesis of Aviva IQ

  • Deborah was feeling overwhelmed with the constant messaging that came with being a successful Airbnb Host
  • They built a simple tool for Deborah and released it so that others could benefit from it as well.

Launch at the 2016 Airbnb Open

How Aviva IQ works

  • Allows hosts to create personalized, automated messages
  • Very simple, intuitive design
  • Connects to your Airbnb listing
  • Comes with templates for: Confirmation, Check-in, Booking extension, Checkout, Review request

Coming functionality

  • More flexibility for customizing messages and email send times
  • Support for 26 different languages

How you can sign up to use Aviva IQ (Beta)

  • www.avivaiq.com
  • 406-662-AVIVA (406-662-8482)
  • Must use a Gmail account to sign up (for now). If you don’t have one yet, you can sign up here.
  • FREE service

Resources Mentioned

Aviva IQ

Connect with Jasper

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @GetPaidForUrPad

Instagram: @GetPaidForYourPad 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/getpaidforyourpad

This episode is sponsored by Hostfully.com where you can create a custom digital guidebook for your guests!

 

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Complete Transcript for Get Paid for Your Pad Episode 119

Jasper:

Welcome to Get Paid For Your Pad, the definitive show on Airbnb hosting, featuring the best advice on how to maximize profits from your Airbnb listing, as well as real-life experiences from Airbnb hosts all over the world. Welcome.

Jasper:

This episode is brought to you by Hostfully, a company that helps you make beautiful guidebooks for your listing. Make your own at hostfully.com/pad, and a special for Get Paid For Your Pad listeners, you’ll get a free guidebook consultation after you make your guidebook.

Welcome, everyone, another episode of Get Paid For Your Pad. Today, I have two guests on the show, Josh and Deborah, and they are the co-founders of a really cool new tool that I personally have been using. It’s an automated messaging tool, and we’re going to learn all about that, but first, I would love to introduce everyone to Josh and Deborah. So, Josh and Deborah, welcome to the show.

Deborah:

Thanks, Jasper, nice to be on the show.

Josh:

Thank you, Jasper. I appreciate you having us.

Jasper:

Yeah, thanks for chiming in. What location are you guys calling in from?

Deborah:

We’re calling from Foster City, California, which is the headquarters for Aviva IQ.

Jasper:

Very nice. Well, I am in cold Holland. It’s about freezing, just around freezing temperatures here, so I’m trying to not go outside too much because I actually don’t have a winter coat, as I usually reside in warm countries. But, for the Christmas days I’m kind of wanted in my family, so I’m always a bit cold around this time of the year.

Josh:

Too funny.

Jasper:

So, do you guys want to introduce yourselves to the listeners?

Deborah:

Yeah, sure. So, my first experience with working at a bed-and-breakfast was while I was in college at Berkeley, and then my professional background has been in marketing for high-tech companies, including Yahoo and McAfee, for the last two decades. And, more recently, and more importantly, I’ve been an Airbnb host for the last four years.

Josh:

And, hi, I’m Josh, and my background, I had started a couple different software companies before going in-house to a big company, Oracle, where I ran Global Sales Engineering and was responsible for 16 of Oracle’s cloud products while I was there, and also ran their internal Entrepreneurship Program before teaming up with Deborah to start Aviva IQ.

Jasper:

Very cool. And, Deborah, how did you get involved with Airbnb? How did you find out about it?

Deborah:

Well, you know, we have friends in the area who were Airbnb-ing rooms in their homes, and so we learned about it that way, and we were in a position where we had the opportunity to Airbnb our apartment. And so, we decided to give that a shot, and it worked out really well. It was a lot of fun, and it kind of took everything I had worked on before with my bed-and-breakfast experience, my marketing, and always loving that personal experience in marketing to put it all together. And it was just a really great experience, so we decided to just kind of go for it and dive in.

Jasper:

And did you rent out while you were out of town, or did you rent out full-time?

Deborah:

Yeah, so it was full-time.

Jasper:

Okay, very cool. And so, you started about four years ago, you said, maybe around 2012, 2013, so back then, Airbnb was a lot smaller than it was now. What are some of the most memorable experiences that you had throughout your hosting journey?

Deborah:

You know, I guess the most wonderful experience has just been meeting people from all over the world with diverse backgrounds, and stories, and reasons why they were visiting. And, I think, that just to me has been the most wonderful and rewarding experience, is giving them that very personal experience for them to stay with us, or to stay in our place, and to me, that was the most wonderful part of being a host.

Jasper:

Right. And with your experience in the B&B industry, was it very easy for you to get started?

Deborah:

Yeah, so, I don’t know if “easy” is… Like any new venture, there’s always learnings to be had, but it was something that I loved to do. You know, I became my own sort of little hotel concierge, so I could really make it what I wanted to do, make it look the way I wanted it to look, and provide the level of customer experience that I always wanted to have. So, it’s like a little mini-company in a way. So, it was a lot of fun, and it has been a lot, a lot of fun.

Jasper:

Awesome. And did your Airbnb experience, did that lead to you guys creating Aviva IQ?

Deborah:

Yes, absolutely. So, with managing, that became, increasingly, a full-time job for me, where a lot of messaging had to be managed, a lot of post-booking emails had to be managed, and it increasingly became, very much, a big load to carry. And that is when I got together with Josh here, and we talked about joining efforts to automate a lot of this messaging so that it could make it much more manageable and automated.

Josh:

And, as we talked to other Airbnb host friends about what we were building for ourselves, it became clear that others were asking, “Well, when you’re done, can I try it, as well? Can I use it, as well?” And so, from there, we said, “Well, we were intending to build this for Deborah for her business, but it’s a whole other project to build it in a user-friendly way or build it in a scalable way.” So, we really had to shift the thinking on how to productize it, as opposed to just getting it done for our own purposes. But, yeah, that’s how it got off the ground.

Jasper:

So, initially, you didn’t intend to create a company around this?

Deborah:

No. This was really something, just, that was going to make my life easier, for me, and when I saw how much of an impact that had on me, I started talking to these friends of ours who are hosting, and it very quickly became evident that this is something that they would also find very useful. And so, that’s when we started thinking about, “Well, why don’t we just offer this to the entire Airbnb community?” So, launching at the Airbnb Open was just a beautiful opportunity for us to do that.

Jasper:

Right. And talking about the Airbnb Open, which was back in November in Los Angeles, you guys did a tremendous job at making yourselves visible during the Airbnb Open, because, I mean, I was just running into Aviva IQ people all the time, people handing me flyers. And, you know, I’d never heard of Aviva IQ before I arrived at the Airbnb Open, and so, you guys definitely put yourselves on the radar. That was a great effort.

Deborah:

Thanks, Jasper.

Josh:

Yeah, kudos to Deborah and her marketing background on that one.

Jasper:

Yeah, absolutely. That was definitely inspiring. And, you know, I think the best ideas are always born out of when you encounter a problem for yourself and you solve it for yourself, and then people want, basically, want your solution, right? Because I think there’s kind of two ways how you can create a product, or an idea, or a business. It’s you can either, just, you come up with an idea that you think is really cool and then you try to push it, you push it out, right?

Deborah:

Right.

Jasper:

And then, you never know if other people are going to like the idea as much as you do, right. So, I think a lot of people sort of get disappointed, and including me, when you create something or you launch something, and you’re really excited and you’re like, “Oh! Everyone’s going to love this!” and then nobody wants it, versus when you just create something for yourself, and then people just kind of pull it away from you and say, “Hey, I want that! Give it to me, as well.” I think that’s usually a route that leads to more successful results.

Josh:

Yeah. And, as I mentioned earlier, I had started two other companies before, and I can tell you, I learned the lesson you just mentioned the hard way in my first one. So, yeah, starting with the idea in mind, that doesn’t always work.

Jasper:

Yeah, exactly. It’s kind of shocking, you know, when you realize that a lot of people don’t think it’s as cool as you do.

Josh:

You got it.

Jasper:

I’ve experienced this, as well, so I know what you’re talking about, but it’s an important lesson to learn. And I think entrepreneurship, in general, is all about putting yourself out there and trying things, and then, through your experiences, you learn what not to do, and eventually, you’ve done all the things that you shouldn’t do, and then there’s only the right thing to do.

Deborah:

Right.

Josh:

Definitely.

Jasper:

So, let’s talk about Aviva IQ. I’ve been using it, I think it’s a great app, but I’ll let you guys explain what the app is all about.

Josh:

Yeah, sure, so I’ll jump in. So, Aviva IQ is a service that’s meant to make life easier for Airbnb hosts. So, as a host, there’s a ton of messaging that goes on between the host and the guest in terms of responding or suggesting content that should be put in front of the guest. For instance, after a booking is made, having a personalized confirmation message go to the guest, or before the guest arrives, sending check-in details for where they get the keys, what the Wi-Fi details are, what directions they’ll need, all the way until, prior to checking out, what kind of check-out information they’ll need to know, how to strip the beds, or where to put the keys, or what information is relevant for that property, and so on.

And so, Aviva IQ is all about allowing hosts to create messages like these that are personalized so that it’ll always reference the guest’s name by name, but will be automated so that they go out with the correct message that’ll be sent to each guest at the right time, because they can be scheduled to go out at a certain time, and they go out at that time for every guest all the time.

Jasper:

And it’s a very easy-to-use app. I’ve been using it for about a month-and-a-half or so now. And it’s funny because you can almost tell that you’ve created it for yourself, initially, because of its simplistic design, and it doesn’t look super-fancy or anything. And I really like that because it just makes it so easy to use. I mean, it almost feels like something that was created just for me, if that makes sense.

Deborah:

Yeah. Yeah, thanks, Jasper. It was created for me, and I’m not very technical, as Josh can attest to, so I figured, if I can use it, anyone can use it. And when we decided that we were going to create something bigger than what it originally was, this was really important for me, is that we keep it very simple, not complicated, because we really wanted it to be just what it is now, you know, a very helpful tool.

Josh:

It’s funny you say that. There’s actually a specific effort that was made when we made the decision to move from it being just for Deborah to being for others, as to what do we take out of the product. So, there was a lot more that we built that we chose, specifically, not to keep in the product. And we may choose to pull some of those features in over time, but really, our goal was, if this was going to be for a lot of other people, what’s going to be the simplest, easiest, most obvious thing that they could pick up on their own, and then learn from them, what are the things we’re missing, and what are the features that we should be adding. And, potentially, they’re things that we already have and we can pull back in, or potentially, it’s things that we really don’t have and we build and we add in over time.

Jasper:

Yeah, I think that’s really smart. It reminds me of the minimal value product concept that I read about in, I think it’s, “The Lean Startup”, is the book.

Josh:

Yeah, MVP, minimum viable product.

Jasper:

Exactly, yeah. Because it must be tempting. If you think, you create this app, you know, it’s kind of like your baby and a lot of people will think, “Oh, when I put it out there, I want it to be as good as it could be. I want to add all these different things, and I want to make it perfect.” But, instead, you start with something fairly basic and then you see, you get feedback from your customers and stuff, and then based on that, you expand it and you add some more functionalities.

Josh:

Absolutely.

Deborah:

Exactly. And our struggle is constantly to remind each other that, “Look, remember, we want to make this very simple, and not add so many bells and whistles,” because there are other players out there who offer similar type services that are very robust and complicated, and so, we’re trying to offer this type of service in a very simplistic way.

Jasper:

Yeah, I think that’s a really good move, because, you know, when you get a new app and you don’t know how it works, if it has too many options, then it can be kind of overwhelming, and you know how people have very little patience these days. So, you know, if I don’t understand it within a few minutes, it’s just too many things going on, then I might just say, “Oh, you know what, I’ll look at this later.” Right?

Josh:

Yeah.

Jasper:

And then, I might just forget because there’s other things going on in my life, right. And so, with this, I started using it and I, literally, I just opened it and I was like, “Oh, okay. I see exactly how this works. This looks very simple, so let me just create a message and turn it on.” And that’s what I did, and I like it. I really like it. I think it’s very important, you know, when a guest books an Airbnb to immediately send a message. And I think that comes across as very professional and it creates an image. It creates the idea that the host is going to really take care of his guests, right?

Deborah:

Yes.

Josh:

Absolutely.

Jasper:

And so, that’s the one that I… I mean, you could send several messages, (and I’ll go through the different messages in a minute), but this particular one, the confirmation message, I think, is extremely important. You can use the guest’s name. So, there’s all these different tags. There’s ‘guest name’, ‘property name’, ‘property address’, ‘check-in date’, ‘check-in time’, and so, in your messages, you can use those tags and it will automatically put in whatever those tags are defined as, and so it makes it very personal. People aren’t going to feel like you just sent them a general message.

And, you can also import saved messages from Airbnb, so it’s very convenient. You, literally, just the app connects to your Airbnb listing, you can import your messages, but it also comes with templates. So, if you’re unsure of exactly what to write there, at least you have a good example. That might be specifically helpful for those who aren’t natural English speakers, (such as myself, actually), to have an example of a well-written, grammatically correct message that you can send. It could be helpful for a lot of people, as well, I think.

So, just to go through the different message categories real quick… So, we have ‘Confirmation’, which is sent immediately after somebody confirms, or you can actually set the time, so you can say… I put it at 10 minutes after the confirmation, but you can set your own time. And, the next one is ‘Check-in’, so after somebody’s checked in. You have ‘Booking Extension’…

Josh:

‘Check-in’, by the way, is just before somebody checks in, so it gives them the information for check-in.

Jasper:

Oh, right. Okay, so I guess there’s multiple ways you can do it, right?

Deborah:

Yeah.

Jasper:

You can do it before and after. You can set that. You can choose, yourself, because it has the option ‘before check-in’ or ‘after check-in’, right?

Josh:

So, the way we set up these templates, for now, are actually locked in, so it prevents folks from making a mistake accidentally. In fact, one of the things we’ll be building down the road are customizable messages that could be before or after any specific event. But, the way it was built initially, and at which we have it today, is those five templates have specific rules that anchor on specific events, but the timer may change. So, in the case of a ‘Confirmation’ message, it has to be after a booking, but you set the number of minutes, where the ‘Check-in’ has to be before the check-in because it’s giving them the instructions for check-in, but you set the number of minutes or hours or days before check-in. And so on.

Jasper:

Okay, right. Okay, thanks for clarifying that. Yeah, I see it now. I see that, yeah, because I’m looking at the app right now, as we speak. They’re locked, indeed, so you can choose the time. And then, there’s the third one that’s called ‘Booking Extension’, and I’ll let you explain that one, but let me just quickly go through the other ones. The fourth one is ‘Check-out’, and then the last one is ‘Review Request’. So, those are all the different categories, and I think they’re all pretty self-explanatory except for ‘Booking Extension’. You might want to elaborate a little bit on that one.

Josh:

Yeah, I’ll jump in. So, ‘Booking Extension’ is a message that has some intelligence behind it. It’s a message that will go out if, and only if, there’s a vacancy after that reservation before the next reservation starts. And so, it’s a message meant to allow hosts that are trying to book every last day they can to have a message go out to that guest, asking that guest if they want to extend their stay. And so, if there’s that vacancy, it gives them the ability to increase that length of stay and have a higher occupancy, and hopefully bring in some extra cash in the process.

Jasper:

That’s very cool. And do you guys have any data on how many guests actually go ahead and extend their stay?

Josh:

Yeah, so it’s still pretty early days for us, but we’re seeing approximately 7% to 8% conversion rate for ‘Booking Extension’ messages that go out to what converts into an extended booking.

Jasper:

Okay. That’s very cool because it’s very little effort. All you need to do is just activate the message.

Deborah:

Right.

Josh:

In fact, you’ll laugh. I actually had come back from the Airbnb Open and saw that Deborah had two booking extensions that took place during the conference itself.

Jasper:

Oh, wow. That’s great. It pays off immediately.

Josh:

The stars aligned that weekend. I won’t promise that that’s going to happen every weekend, but it just happened to be that she got two out of that. So, yeah, it was almost like the stars up above knew to align themselves when we were out promoting the new product.

Jasper:

Very cool.

Deborah:

Yeah, but the feedback we’ve been getting has been, across the board, has been so positive, and a very common feedback that we get back are from hosts who are telling us how they can’t believe that while they’re sleeping, these messages are being sent out in a very personalized, automatic way. So, that’s really exciting. You know, people don’t have to worry about these messages.

Jasper:

Yeah, I think there’s a lot of value in there because, you know, we live in different time zones, and so I’m sure most hosts always try to respond as quickly as possible because we all know how important that is, but if you’re asleep, you can’t really respond unless you’re a very special human being, unless you have some super powers. But I, personally, I’m not very good at responding to messages when I’m sleeping, so it’s great, you know. You wake up in the morning and you see somebody’s booked your place, and they already received an email with more information. So, I think it’s great.

Hosts, I can’t emphasize how important it is to share recommendations of things to do or eat near your listing beforehand. Your guests won’t have to go through TripAdvisor, Foursquare, or Yelp. They won’t have to scratch their head and think about possible places right in the moment. I’ve been using Hostfully to create an online and printable guidebook to show my guests my favorite coffee places in Amsterdam. They use my recommendations, and I’m getting fewer questions from my guests as a result. I’ve also included screenshots of my guidebook on my Airbnb listing as a way to differentiate my listing from others. So, make your own guidebook at hostfully.com/pad.

One message that I would like to see added is a message that will go out automatically after somebody makes an inquiry. Is that something that you guys are planning to implement?

Josh:

Yeah, we are. So, that’s something we’re calling a ‘Touch Base’ message where it’ll be, give or take, a certain number of hours or a day after the guest arrives. It will have a template set up that’ll say, “Thank you for staying with us. Just touching base to make sure everything is going okay.” So, absolutely, that’ll be coming.

But, on top of that, we’re actually planning to allow for more customizable messages, as well. So, where today we locked in those messages in the templates that we provided, those five templates, it’s going to become more free-form so that folks can pick and choose any messages, and name their messages, and add it before or after any specific event, so it’s going to make it a lot more flexible. But, the beauty about the way it was built was that people couldn’t mess it up, and it allows them to learn in a controlled environment, so far.

Jasper:

Yeah, absolutely. I love the design. But, just to be clear. So, you’re talking about a message that you would send out, like the day after the guest arrived or a few hours after they arrived, to sort of just check in with them and say, “Hey, how is everything? Okay?” That’s the one that you were referring to, right?

Josh:

Yes, exactly.

Jasper:

So, I was wondering, can you also add a message that’s sent out after someone makes an inquiry, so before the booking is made, if someone is just requesting information or just inquiring if the place is available?

Josh:

Yeah, gotcha. So, and that goes to the customizable messages. So, what we’re going towards will allow for any type of event, before or after. So, it could be, in the example you’re saying, is at minutes or hours after an initial inquiry comes in, they can send, basically, an auto-reply message back, but they could put a delay on it. So, minutes or hours after an initial inquiry comes in, it can respond back when they’re sleeping, and that’s one example. They can go after a booking and go before a check-in, or after a check-in, or before a check-out, or after a check-out, so any different permutation, including after the initial inquiry, which is the example that you brought up here.

Jasper:

Yeah, because I think that would be a very neat addition because people typically make inquiries with multiple listings, because on the Airbnb website, Airbnb actually encourages guests to inquire with multiple hosts, right. If you book a place in Airbnb, you inquire with a host, and you get this pop-up message that says, “Oh, don’t stop. Make some more inquiries.” And so, I think it’s really important that, as a host, to respond immediately because, I know from my own experience with staying at Airbnbs, if I send out six messages, the host that responds the quickest has the biggest chance of locking down the booking, and if somebody doesn’t respond for a few hours, even though I know that that person could be asleep, it still decreases the chance that I’ll end up staying there just because somebody else will respond, and then I just get engaged with that person.

Josh:

Absolutely.

Jasper:

And then, if I can find a good price and I feel like the host is good, you know, then… So, I think just even sending a message that says, “Hey, I’m asleep right now, but I’ll get back to you as soon as I wake up,” even something like that, I think, would help, because then I would think, “Oh, this host took the effort to figure out how to send automated responses, so that host must be taking his Airbnb business pretty serious,” which is a good thing, right?

Deborah:

Right, they’re on top of it, yeah.

Jasper:

Exactly. So, I think that would definitely be a neat addition. Are there any other functionalities that you guys are planning to implement in the near future?

Josh:

Yeah. So, what we’ll be adding, support for different languages and auto-detection of languages, as well. So, where today it supports the English characters, and I say that that way because I see folks using it that are using it in Spanish or French, or other languages. It may be missing an accent or a tilde here or there, but it’s almost effectively supporting many of those languages today. But, for languages that have all different types of characters, the intent is to be able to support all of the languages, the 26 languages that Airbnb supports, but be smart enough so that folks who host can have templates or messages in multiple languages and auto-detect what language the guest is communicating in, and then send the correct response in the language that matches what they want to hear and be spoken to.

Jasper:

That’s a very neat addition, indeed, and I’m sure guests will love to receive messages in their own language. I always try to respond in their own language if I can, but I’m kind of limited to just a few languages.

Josh:

How many languages do you speak?

Jasper:

Well, I mean, I speak Dutch and English, and my level of German, Spanish, Portuguese is good enough to respond to messages, you know, maybe here and there with a little help from Google Translate, but I definitely can communicate in those languages. And French, not so much anymore. I used to be pretty good at it because we learned it in school, but it’s been a while. So, I actually just had a French guest last week, and it was a bit of a challenge because that person didn’t speak English at all, so I had to speak French with him. And, also, it happened to be one of my most demanding guests that I’ve ever had in my life. So, I was getting text messages, like several text messages, every single day, and it was a bit of a challenge to respond.

Josh:

And you’re limited on Google Translate.

Jasper:

Yeah, well, but fortunately my mom speaks really well, French, so she helped me out a bit when I was at my parents’ place, but when I wasn’t, yeah, I had to go into Google Translate. And he was asking such basic questions like, for example, how to get to the train station, so I would send over screenshots of Google Maps where I’d literally just put in the address and the train station, and then you know how Google Maps gives you the directions, and then I was taking screenshots and just sending it because I didn’t know how to explain it in French. So, anyway, but that’s another story.

Let’s talk about how, for the people that are listening right now and are thinking, “Hey, I want to try this,” how do people sign up and what are the details, like what are the costs, what’s involved in the process.

Deborah:

Yeah. For anybody who’s interested in signing up for our beta product, they can go directly to our website, and that’s www.avivaiq.com. That’s www.A-V-I-V-A-I-Q.com. They can also call us at 406-66-AVIVA, or that’s 406-662-8482. And it’s free. So, we launched, like, Jasper, you said, we launched our public beta at the Airbnb Open and we’ve been working with hosts trying to identify premium features, but we are, right now, committed to always providing a free offering. So, that’s our commitment.

Jasper:

Very cool. And how do people sign up?

Deborah:

Yeah. So, once they go to our website, they’ll just click on the ‘Join Beta’ button on the website, and they’ll just enter their Airbnb credentials, and it’s pretty straightforward. They’ll just link their properties and it all happens very quickly in just a few steps.

Jasper:

Right. And, because I signed up recently, so I remember you signed up with a Google account. Is that correct?

Josh:

Yeah. So, today, we’re focused on keeping it simple by having folks sign up with a Gmail account, and we’ll expand that in the future, as well, but that just keeps it super-simple. And so, when you click ‘Join Now’, it’ll bring you to a sign-up page where you add your Gmail, and Gmail keeps the password safe, so we never even get access to the Gmail password. And once you register with your Gmail, then it’ll bring you to the page where you’ll link your Airbnb account to your Aviva IQ account, and then it immediately starts importing your properties into Aviva IQ. And from there, you can either take the templates or edit those templates and set up your own messages.

Deborah:

Or, import your Airbnb templates, as well.

Jasper:

So, it’s very simple, so people can pretty much start using it the day that they sign up.

Deborah:

Yeah.

Josh:

Absolutely.

Jasper:

And because it’s an online tool, it’s not fixed to certain locations, so it’s available for hosts all around the world, I imagine?

Josh:

All around the world. In fact, we’ve got hosts that are using it in tons of different countries already, and in the various states across the U.S. But, in England, in France…

Deborah:

Australia.

Josh:

Australia, in Italy, in Trinidad and Tobago, and we’ve been finding folks that are using it in places that we’ve never been to, and in some cases, in places that we’ve never even heard of before.

Jasper:

That’s pretty cool. So, you’re learning something through the experience about the different places on planet Earth.

Josh:

Yeah, I’m learning the map in the process.

Jasper:

Nice, very nice. And are you guys doing this together, or do you have a whole team behind it?

Josh:

We’re doing it together, along with our team. So, we have a couple technical folks that are on the team, as well.

Jasper:

Okay. And do you guys both have jobs on the side, or is this a full-time commitment?

Deborah:

Full-time.

Jasper:

All in.

Deborah:

Yeah. Yeah, all in.

Josh:

All in.

Jasper:

Okay, great. That’s awesome. Very cool. Well, we’re getting towards the end of the episode. Is there anything else you would like to share with the listeners?

Deborah:

Happy New Year! No, we’ve enjoyed speaking to you, Jasper. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to talk about Aviva IQ.

Jasper:

Yeah, of course, of course. You guys are very welcome. I’m very happy with your product because it saves me time, so I’m glad to share that with everybody.

Josh:

Absolutely. I’m glad that you’re using it, and we’re loving to hear your feedback as we keep going. We’re going to keep learning from folks like you and other hosts, so definitely want to keep growing and keep learning.

Jasper:

Awesome. All right, well, thanks again for joining. And thanks, everybody, for listening, and of course, if you want to try Aviva IQ, go to the website, Aviva IQ… Is it ‘.co’ or is it ‘.com’?

Josh:

‘.com’. C-O-M.

Jasper:

‘.com’. A lot of start-ups, I’ve noticed, they have the extension ‘.co’ these days, but you guys are sticking to the traditional, the good old ‘.com’. So, yeah, I definitely recommend it. It’s been great for me, and it’s free, so it’s really kind of a no-brainer.

And, of course, you can check out the show notes at getpaidforyourpad.com/podcast. Every podcast episode has show notes there. It also has a transcription if you like to read. And, if you want to learn more about Airbnb hosting, there’s plenty of ways to do that. There’s plenty of resources on getpaidforyourpad.com. Of course, there’s my book on Amazon that you can find by searching for the keyword “Airbnb”. It typically shows up on the top. And, of course, all the other podcast episodes, as well as lots of blog posts.

So, one more thing I wanted to mention is that every Friday at 8:30 PST, I do a live Facebook video these days. So, it’s pretty fun. A lot of people have been tuning in. I talk about my journey to invest in multiple Airbnbs around the world. I’m actually flying to Chile and Columbia and Panama soon to check out some properties over there. So, if you’re interested in Airbnb investing and buying some properties abroad, then you can also go ahead and go to getpaidforyourpad.com/airbnb-investing, and there, you can leave your email and I’ll send you some useful tools that I use. I have some worksheets and some research sheets that are very helpful to me, so I’m happy to share that with everybody else.

So, thanks again for listening, and hopefully we’ll see you next week. Bye-bye.

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