Airbnb Cancellation Policy: Which One Should You Use?

Airbnb Cancellation Policy: Which One Should You Use?

Airbnb Cancellation Policy

Sometimes when we make travel plans, life gets in the way and we may want to cancel our existing reservations. This is no different for Airbnb guests. As a host, cancellations aren’t fun, particularly if it’s a last-minute one, leaving very little time to find a new guest. Therefore, it’s important to choose the right Airbnb cancellation policy.

Airbnb hosts can partially be compensated for cancellations, depending on which cancellation policy they choose. Airbnb provides six cancellation policy options:

  1. Flexible – Guests are entitled to a full refund one day prior to arrival.
  2. Airbnb Flexible Cancellation Policy

  3. Moderate – Guests are entitled to a full refund five days prior to arrival.
  4. Airbnb Moderate Cancellation Policy

  5. Strict – Guests are entitled to a 50% refund up until one week prior to arrival.
  6. Airbnb strict cancellation policy

  7. Super Strict 30 – Guests are entitled to a 50% refund up until 30 days prior to arrival.
  8. Cancellation policy Airbnb

  9. Super Strict 60 – Guests are entitled to a 50% refund up until 60 days prior to arrival.
  10. Airbnb Cancellation policies

  11. Long Term – First month down payment is required; 30 days notice is necessary for lease termination.
  12. Airbnb Cancellation Policy

Which Airbnb cancellation policy should you choose?

The short answer is, it depends. For new hosts, I definitely recommend the flexible policy. For seasoned hosts, it could be flexible or moderate. I advice against using the strict cancellation policy.

Note that the super strict 30 and super strict 60 cancellation policies are only available by invitation and under special circumstances. I’m not sure what these are and I’ve never seen anyone use these.

For new Airbnb hosts: flexible is the way

For new hosts, I recommend choosing the flexible policy, in particular for hosts who are just starting out. The reason is that at the beginning stage of your Airbnb business, getting bookings is of the highest importance. A flexible policy promotes bookings as guests know that they can cancel for a small fee (they only lose the Airbnb fees.)

When I say new, I mean hosts who haven’t reached near full occupancy yet. An empty room or house makes nothing, so if you have big gaps in your calendar, the last thing you want to do is deter guests from making a booking by having a moderate or strict cancellation policy.

For seasoned hosts: flexible or moderate

If you’ve been doing Airbnb for a while and you’re almost always fully booked, you could use the flexible or the moderate policy. I don’t have a strong opinion on which of these is better.

The main difference between these policies is that the moderate policy offers the guest only a 50% refund when cancelled less than five days before check-in, and a full refund if cancelled earlier. The flexible policy provides a full refund if cancelled more than a day in advance.

As you already have a strong reputation on the Airbnb platform, I don’t think a moderate cancelation policy will lose you a lot of bookings. At the same time, it doesn’t offer much protection either, because from my experience (I’ll provide some numbers below) cancellations happen more than five days in advance, so both policies would provide a full refund to the guest.

Why I believe you shouldn’t use the strict cancellation policy

The difference between the strict policy and the other two is quite significant, as guests are not eligible for a full refund, no matter how long in advance they cancel. I strongly believe this policy deters users from booking and the vast majority of bookings lost wouldn’t have been cancelled anyway. Here’s why.

The numbers: less than 9% of reservations were cancelled

First of all, cancellations are pretty rare in general. With a moderate cancelation policy in place, I accepted 379 reservation requests during my hosting journey in Amsterdam, and only 33 cancelled. That’s less than 9%. That means that only about one in twelve bookings were canceled.

Only one of these bookings was cancelled less than five days before check-in, so I got to keep 50% of the booking amount. I lost a total of 25 booking days as a result of the cancellations. I calculated this by looking at the days that were cancelled and how many of these days I managed to book after the cancellation.

In other words, during nearly five years of hosting, only 25 booking days were cancelled that I didn’t manage to re-book. That’s a very small number, about 2.5% given that I’ve hosted a total of 1087 days. I’m fairly confident that if I would have had a strict cancelation policy in place, I would have hosted significantly fewer days.

The reason is simple. Our brains are wired to always consider the worst case scenario. Whenever we commit to something, the “what if?” question pops up. This can make us feel uncomfortable to commit, specially when dates are far into the future.

This is the reason that hotel bookings websites have started to offer the free cancellation option up until the day before check-in for a lot of hotels. It gives the booker the peace of mind that if plans would change, they can cancel. However, it’s very rare that these plans actually change, as you can see from the numbers that I provided.

booking.com free cancellation

How to easily compose this data for your listing

If you want to easily access this data for your listing, in your Airbnb dashboard go to “Your Reservations,” scroll down to the bottom and select “View all reservation history.” Then click on the “Print this page” in the top right corner. Now use the “find” function (usually ctrl-F or command-F) and search for “accepted” to find your total number of reservations and “cancelled” for the total amount of cancellations.

Now scroll through the list to count the “fake” cancellations. I had 11 out of 44 that weren’t real cancelations, these were bookings where the booker made a mistake, cancelled and made a new booking.

New cancellation policy is being tested in Italy

Airbnb is testing a change to their cancellation policies in Italy. The main changes are:

=> host fees are increased for the moderate policy (4% instead of 3%) and strict (5% instead of 3%)
=> a 100% refund now includes the Airbnb fees
=> changes in the cut-off time for moderate (from 5 to 7) and strict (from 7 to 30)

The new policies are simplified in the sense that all policies now include a period of time where the guest can cancel without any financial loss.

new airbnb cancelation policy italy

Clearly the new policies are more in favor of the guests and the initial reaction from Italian hosts isn’t very positive, as could be expected.

Airbnb is aiming to make their platform more user friendly by incentivizing hosts to adopt the flexible cancellation policy. Although I understand the pushback from hosts, in the long term I think this is a good thing. The increased user-friendlyness will help the platform attract more users, which will benefit hosts.

More info on the Airbnb Cancellation Policy

=> Airbnb’s website
=> Airbnb help center
=> The new cancellation policies explained in detail

Join the conversation! What Airbnb cancellation policy are you using? Comment below.

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