EP126: This Week in the World of Airbnb

EP126: This Week in the World of Airbnb


In November of 2015, Airbnb Global Policy Chief Chris Lehane announced the bold goal of forming 100 home sharing clubs in 2016. Today, a global network of 112 of these advocacy organizations fight regulatory battles and engage in partnerships with small businesses to enrich the local economy and culture.

On this episode of the podcast, Jasper is joined by Emery Lieberman, Airbnb’s Global Home Sharing Clubs Mobilization Program Manager, and David Jacoby, CEO and Co-founder of Hostfully, to discuss how the company was able to reach the ambitious aim of establishing 100 organizations in a year, the role they play in their communities and the clubs that have celebrated particular success in fighting regulations – by telling their stories.

They also cover Airbnb’s statement-making Super Bowl commercial highlighting the company’s commitment to inclusiveness. Find how Airbnb took a big stand on a big stage!

Some of the topics covered

Airbnb Community vs. Airbnb Citizen Clubs

  • The community is an online platform where hosts connect and ask general questions
  • Clubs are specific to a given city and focus on location-specific public policy issues and philanthropic projects

The Role of Home Sharing Clubs Around the World

  • Gives hosts a voice in the political sphere
  • Airbnb provides resources, but clubs are led by hosts
  • Allows hosts the opportunity to educate communities and partner with other small businesses

The Journey to Establishing 100 Clubs

  • Many were organizing already
  • In cities with multiple hosts, leaders were identified and offered resources to create their own vision
  • Hosts want to feel connected to a support system

Home Sharing Club Success Stories

  • Defeat of Prop F in San Francisco
  • Advocacy in Barcelona
  • The power of storytelling in New Orleans

Airbnb’s Political Super Bowl Ad

  • CEO Brian Chesky has criticized Trump’s travel ban
  • The ad’s #weaccept aligns with Airbnb’s mission of creating a world where anyone can belong

Resources Mentioned

Airbnb Community Forum

Airbnb Community Clubs Page

Airbnb Citizen Forum

Airbnb Citizen Clubs Page

Airbnb’s Super Bowl Ad

Connect with Jasper

Email: jasper@getpaidforyourpad.com

Twitter: @GetPaidForUrPad

Instagram: @GetPaidForYourPad 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/getpaidforyourpad

This episode is sponsored by Aviva IQ. Aviva IQ automates messages to your Airbnb guests. It’s also free!

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Complete Transcript for Get Paid for Your Pad Episode 126

Welcome to Get Paid for Your Pad, the definitive show on Airbnb hosting, featuring the best advice on how to maximize profits from yourAirbnb listing, as well as real life experiences from Airbnb hosts all over the world. Welcome.

Jasper: 

I’ve begun using a really cool service from Aviva IQ, and it’s made my life so much easier. My guests love receiving all the important details about their stay exactly when they need it, and I love all the five-star reviews I’m getting on communication. Check them out at www.AvivaIQ.com.

Welcome, everybody, to episode number 126. This is a very special episode, because we’re going to be discussing some of the Airbnb news that came out recently, but we also have a very special guest on the show, and her name is Emery, who oversees the home sharing groups in the United States. Her official title is the All America Mobilization Manager, and of course I’m also joined by one of the team members of Hostfully, and this time it’s David, of course my favorite team member, and he’s also the CEO and Co-founder of Hostfully.

Emery and David, welcome to the show.

Emery :

Thank you. You can’t see me blushing, but I’m blushing over here.

David:

Hey, Jasper. Great to have you. How you doing today?

Jasper:

I’m doing very well. I’m sitting in the Weston on a beach in Panama, overlooking the ocean, and there’s about … I’d say about three, four-hundred pelicans diving into the ocean to catch fish right in front of me. It’s a pretty spectacular sight.

David:

We are in an office meeting room.

Jasper: 

That’s pretty exciting, too. Anyway, let’s talk about Airbnb communities and Airbnb Home Sharing Clubs, and I want to start out with a question, because I’m sometimes a little bit confused when it comes to Airbnb communities, and I’m sure Emery can share some light on this. There’s Community.Airbnb.com, where you can sign up for communities that are based in all different cities and markets around the world, and there’s also TheAirbnbCitizen.com. Emery, could you explain, what’s the difference between those two?

Emery:

That is a really great question, so at Airbnb, the Community Center itself is a online platform for hosts to connect with each other to get online support for any question they may have, to do with anything about hosting. If you meander on over to Community.Airbnb.com, you’ll be able to see hosts posting questions about, “Hey, I have a guest who’s locked out. What am I supposed to do? How do I get them the keys? Can anybody give me advice?” To questions on taxes, to other local hosts, to guests who are interested in maybe starting to host and they are curious as to how they even get started, and it’s just a safe space for hosts to get each other’s feedback and thoughts on any subject they may have.

Airbnb Citizen is a little bit more of an online resource supported by our public policy team for anyone anywhere to get information about what’s going on in their given city, around public policy, around any, like, disaster response efforts we’re doing, any social good impact projects and so on. It’s a little bit more information from Airbnb to our community, and the Airbnb Community Center is a place for hosts and guests and users to interface with each other. Does that answer your question, Jasper?

Jasper:

It does. Thank you for clarifying that.

Emery: 

Great. Of course.

David:  

I’d love to hear a little bit about the genesis of Home Sharing Clubs. What exactly is that? Where were you with things a year ago-ish when you started, and where are you today?

Emery: 

Happy to answer that one. Peter Kwan, I don’t know if he’s been a guest on this show before, but he should definitely be a next guest at some point. Peter Kwan started the Home Shares of San Francisco in 2008, because he saw a need for hosts to come together and have a space that was completely independent of the company to discuss what was going on around regulations, and taxes, and just have a support center for hosts to support other hosts. That became really the cornerstone of our efforts in San Francisco, to make sure that we passed fair and clear progressive legislation in the city itself and were able to make in the very simple registration process for hosts to be able to share the home in which they live, in San Francisco.

We went through many, many iterations of political battles and upheavals, and grassroots efforts to talk to elected officials and talk to the San Francisco supervisors, and then in 2014, 2015, we had a full [inaudible 00:05:39] ballot campaign to make sure that the city voted no on proposition F to protect home sharing in San Francisco from a lot of really extreme amendments. A lot of what we were able to do in San Francisco as a community of Airbnb hosts as well as the company being able to support the efforts of the Airbnb hosts was to work with the San Francisco home sharers. With these amazing leaders, who like David Jacoby, like Peter Kwan, like so many others who could lead their group of hosts, we were able … We as Airbnb were able to partner with the Home Sharing Group of San Francisco to really make sure we fought for what the hosts wanted, and we were able to equip them with the tools to be effective in their advocacy.

At the end of 2015, proposition F in San Francisco failed. Everyone said, “Rah rah. How wonderful. Home sharing can survive another day.” Chris Lehane had a public policy at Airbnb Open in Paris in 2015, announced to everybody that one of the reasons why we were so successful in San Francisco was because we had this independent group led by hosts and for hosts, on the ground, that could really be their own voice in the political sphere. He announced to everybody that Airbnb would help support the launch of 100 of these home sharing clubs around the world, and he would support them by giving them the tools to be effective in their advocacy, but really this was a space just for hosts to make an impact in their community and really determine what their vision for change would be.

In a lot of cities where these clubs started forming, it was about advocacy, making sure they had fair, clear laws that made sure that it was, like, really easy for hosts to comply in a way that didn’t affect the housing market in many of these urban centers, and then a lot of these other smaller cities, where there wasn’t any political question or gray area, they were doing a lot of volunteerism. The hosts got together to say, “We all love hosting. We want to support each other and be the very best hosts possible, but we also want to educate our community, our greater community about the benefits of Airbnb.” That meant a lot of also educating small business owners, so obviously Hostfully is a lot about, you know, showing the small business community how Airbnb listings and outlining neighborhoods is really good for a city’s economy, and so a lot of these hosts are in this totally on their own, is they’re going door to door to small business and saying, “Hey, did you know that I’m an Airbnb host? I’ve been in the neighborhood for this long, and please let me partner with you so that both small business community and our Home Sharing Club community can come together to educate all of our neighbors about what this economic and cultural boost means for our local city.”

I know that is a lot of talking at you, but currently we are at … That was the end of 2015, when Chris Lehane made that big announcement, and as of February 5th, 2017, we are at 112 Home Sharing Clubs around the world, and over 40% of these are outside the US, which is really stupendous, because it all began right here in our hometown of San Francisco, but we realized that there were so many hosts all over that were already doing this, but we just wanted to invite them in to be part of this global network so they could connect with other Home Sharing Clubs who felt just as passionately about getting together offline, in living rooms, in small businesses, to come together around a shared vision of, like, what the home sharing impact could be.

David:  

That’s awesome. Thanks for that overview. What are some of the locations of those 112 that we might not think about?

Emery: 

Oh, man. They’re all over the place. If I, without a map right now … Jasper, you’re in Panama right now, correct?

Jasper: 

That is correct.

Emery: 

We don’t have any clubs in Panama right now, but we do have clubs in Mexico City, and Sao Paulo, and Rio, and soon to have one in Brazilia, which is in Brazil as well. I actually have a handy dandy map that I can pull up here with some …

David:  

You can put it in the show notes.

Emery: 

… special locations.

Jasper: 

I love maps.

Emery: 

Oh, good. Me too.

David:  

While you’re bringing that up, one thing that I found real helpful here in San Francisco, when you’re talking about the local merchants and how Airbnb helps support the local economy, there were these little cards that you gave us that we could put in the room where our guests stayed, that they then bring to businesses, and it says, “Hi, I’m Joe.” They write in their name, and, “I’ve been staying at an Airbnb, and I’m an Airbnb guest.” They bring that to different places, and it’s their way of kind of telling the local community how Airbnb is helping them. What I find, on a Tuesday afternoon, there’s a lot of brunch spots, for example, that they’re packed on the weekends, but in the middle of the week, it’s fairly empty, and now that there’s tourists in these neighborhoods, they’re providing more business instead of just spending money at the touristy, overpriced downtown places.

Emery: 

Completely. Yes. We also have these small, or they’re locally loved small business stickers. If you’ve been around and you see, like, Yelp. “We’re recommended on Yelp,” or, like, “TripAdvisor loves us.” These stickers that they can put in the window that helps people come in and recognize that this is a spot that other have recommended. We also have these for Airbnb hosts to give to their small businesses in certain locations, depending on language, and depending on, like, if there are resources to give out these stickers. If a small business puts this in their window, then hopefully Airbnb guests and hosts say, “Wow, this is recommended by Airbnb hosts and Airbnb hosts are the local experts, and they know the best spots, so I’m going to go into this place, because Airbnb hosts recommend it.”

David:  

Awesome. The new Yelp sticker.

Emery: 

The new Yelp sticker.

David:  

Or TripAdvisor sticker.

Emery: 

Yes. We have clubs everywhere, just … I’ll pull up my map. We have a ton in New York. We actually have 13 in the New York area, New York City and New York State, because they’re really active in advocacy efforts there. In Florida, we have clubs in Fort Lauderdale, Miami, Miami Beach. In the southwest, New Orleans, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Santa Fe, Tucson, Scottsdale, Phoenix, and then we get into, you know, California. We’ve got a Sonoma, Moran, Sacramento, the East Bay, Davis, Del Mar, San Luis Obispo, LA, San Diego. In Hawaii, we have clubs in Oahu and Maui, and in the northwest, we have Portland, Seattle, and in Canada we have Vancouver and Toronto.

Then if we look at Europe, for instance, where we just had such an expansion of our amazing clubs in Europe, we have clubs in Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt, Vienna, Zurich, Milan, Brescia, Florence, Rome and Naples, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Porto, San Sebastian, Dublin, London, and then in [inaudible 00:12:59], we have clubs all over Australia, so Byron Bay, Sydney, Melbourne. We also have Tasmania and Auckland, and then we’re starting to get to Tai Pei, Tokyo, Kyoto, Sapporo, so all of these clubs are really for the hosts and by the hosts, which is really, really wonderful, and they all have both an online and offline presence, so it’s a really great way … Something that we provide to clubs is on the Community Center, a space just for clubs to interact with each other, so if you go to www.Airbnb.com/clubs, that will bring you directly to the Clubs pages on the Community Center and this is a space for clubs to discuss all of their upcoming actions, meetings they want to have, what’s going on, sharing interesting articles, and so on.

That’s a really good place for all of you listeners to start, to check out and see if you already have a club in your given city, so that you can check out what’s going on, what they’re talking about, and ask them if you can join in the conversation. That is the perfect place for you to start your journey in the Home Sharing Clubs realm, is to really check out that website and see what your local club is already doing.

Jasper: 

If there isn’t a club yet, then you can start your own.

Emery: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

David:  

How do you do that?

Emery: 

On that Community Center Clubs page, there is a link at the bottom that says, “Don’t see your club listed? Fill out our form here.” This is a way for hosts who don’t have a club yet in their city to explain, like, “What do you see as the vision of impact? What do you think your club could do? What do you see the benefits of bringing hosts together?” Then our team will follow up with some resources and some tools for you to get started.

David:  

I remember at the Airbnb Open in 2015 when Chris Lehane spoke and made the announcement about the 100 clubs, that was pretty ambitious. I mean, that’s like one every three, three and a half days. How did you go about doing that? Did they just, requests come flooding in? Did you know certain Superhosts in cities and reach out to them to see if they are interested in being a leader?

Emery:  Great question. A lot of these cities were already organizing already, so it was a very easy, like, “Hey, we are starting this program. Do you want to be part of it? Do you want to include already your existing organizing efforts and be included in this global network?” Overwhelmingly, people said, “Yes, please. Give me a club page. I’d love to make it easier to do what I’m already doing.” Then there’s a lot of cities that we just know have a ton of hosts. What we could do is really start finding these leaders who really had all of these big visions for what they think their club could do, and really roping them in and giving them all of the, like, access to really talk to other hosts, and to build like a three-month plan. A lot of our clubs, you know, build … They want to have three meetings in three months.

What do they want their meeting to focus on? How many people do they want to be there? How are they going to book a venue, or who’s going to host in their house? Should they have it catered? Do they want to make it pot luck style? Do they want to focus on small business outreach? Do they want to focus on having everyone in the club become a Superhost at the end of the year, and so on? Really, they create their own goal, and then they drive that all themselves. We’re really trying to push these clubs to be, like, fully independent, so that they can really actualize their own vision.

David:  

It’s not always about specific legal policy issues going on. It’s beyond that. It might be, in some cases.

Emery:

It’s very much beyond that. Some cases are, depending on what the political situation is at the time, but really it’s a platform for hosts to come together around their passion for home sharing, and really educate others about what this activity is and what it means for them. Also just to be a host support system for each other. As you know, like, there is a global community center where you can talk to any host around the world about any question you may have, but it’s a little different when you talk to the host down the street, who is your neighbor, about what it means to them to be a host, and potentially pass off referrals, or, “Oh my gosh, I actually can’t host because I had a family emergency. Hey, I have this friend who’s in the club, and I know they provide a really great experience, and they’re even closer to the hospital, for my guest who’s actually taking their child to the local hospital, so let me just set them up with you instead.” It’s all because of these relationships and friendships that can be built in, like, a living room.

David:  

Yeah. I think that’s one great thing about the Airbnb Open. Here in San Francisco there’s a very active community of hosts, and those of us who are involved, we know a lot of hosts. Speaking with some hosts at the Airbnb Open, they came and they didn’t know any other hosts in the area, and to see that they are part of this big group community of hosts everywhere, it made them feel, like, accepted and excited about what they’re doing, and kind of motivated to get a community back home and seek out those other hosts nearby.

You spoke at the Airbnb Open this year, right? How did that go?

Emery: 

It was great. I spoke about the Clubs program as well, just the power of our own community, and how much change we can have when people come together. It was wonderful. We had three hosts up on a panel talking about their own local communities, and that is completely the truest truth, David, about how, you know, you might have this app that you feel connected to, and you feel really connected to these guests who come in and out of your house, that they’re strangers and they leave as friends, and it’s even … It really deeply roots this notion of being like an Airbnb citizen, becomes part of your identity, when it becomes woven through your social fabric. When you have monthly meeting with people that you really recognize, who feel just as passionately about this app as you do and about the guests who come in through their door, and it really takes it to the next level.

Jasper: 

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One question that I have is, you know, you mentioned that there’s over 100 clubs, and that it’s been very successful in San Francisco, where everybody was able to prevent that regulation from coming into place. What other places are there where the Home Sharing Clubs have seen some really good results?

Emery: 

Yes. In Barcelona, they’ve had quite the uphill battle with trying to talk to the city and work with the city to pass fair laws around home sharing, and really differentiate home sharing from, like, property owners for instance, in Barcelona. They have seven neighborhood hyper-local Home Sharing Clubs, so it’s not just like a city-wide club. They actually have, every single neighborhood has their own club with their own leaders, and the leaders come together and they say, “What are we working on this month? But let’s make sure we execute in our own neighborhoods, because this is such a hyper-local issue.” What people are talking about around Airbnb in Eixample might be different than Zona Norte. In that regard, they’ve spent the last year truly trying to educate everybody, small business owners, elected officials, the mayoress and more about what it means to them. You know, they published a position paper, and they’ve written to the newspaper, and published op-eds and so on, and so Barcelona, it’s been a constant dialog with the city, but something really wonderful is the Home Sharing Clubs are speaking directly to city officials.

Also, New Orleans, we had a really great win. A really amazing piece of legislation passed in New Orleans that could have only happened with the power of our community, and hundreds and hundreds of hosts showing up to tell their story. In the world of grassroots organizing, we really believe that the story is the most powerful thing to changing minds and changing hearts, is that you can have someone get into the nitty gritty of a policy, of 60 days versus 90 days, and what should the registration process truly look like, and how do we remit taxes, and it can get into the weeds a lot when it comes to policy, but what is our most powerful thing is these stories that hosts have about how, you know, home sharing has impacted their lives, and enabled them to stay in the cities in which they live, or pay their mortgages, or to afford to put their kids through college, or be able to pay their parents’ medical bills, and the list goes on and on and on.

We see that in all these cities that people are able to make ends meet because of the money they generate through Airbnb, and so a lot of what these clubs are doing, are really instilling that the power of every single individual host is their story. When you have hundreds of hosts show up at a city hall hearing about a piece of legislation and you have hours and hours of public comment, of host, after host, after host talking about what this money means to their lives and what it means to invite guests to New Orleans who never, ever would have been able to have this local experience, and to have it in such an accessible way, that is what changes the entire narrative.

A lot of what our clubs are doing is really to bring and uplift the voice of the host community to make change.

David:  

All right.

Jasper: 

That was a …

Emery: 

Nice and inspirational for you? Do you feel amped, Jasper? Do you want to go tell your story immediately?

Jasper: 

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. It would be very new to me. I’ve never told my story before. I know in Amsterdam …

Emery: 

Wonderful.

Jasper: 

In Amsterdam there’s a very active community, and I know the people who are running the Home Sharing Club in Amsterdam. I actually had a meeting with them before I came to South America, just a few weeks ago. I’m familiar with the efforts there, and Amsterdam is an interesting location, actually, because I think the regulations that Airbnb is now going to actually enforce on the platform by putting a counter on the website for people who host entire homes so that they can’t actually host for more than the amount of days that’s allowed. I think Amsterdam is probably going to be an example for other places as well.

Emery: 

Yes. Amsterdam and London. Yeah, I think that all of this is so new. The laws are new. Airbnb is such a new concept. Our public policy had Chris Lehane off in talks about how Airbnb is kind of like when cars were first on the road. Where people said, “Oh my god. Automobiles are so dangerous. These are so wild. Let’s make sure we ban automobiles on our streets.” You know, we see that was not that long ago at all, and here we are, and many cities are in the same regard, where they’re like, “I don’t understand this activity. I don’t get it. Let’s make sure that it’s banned.” A lot of what we’re doing is really trying to educate cities about, like, “How do we make [inaudible 00:24:44] informed decisions about really progressive, fair regulations that are also easy to comply with, so that hosts have a really easy time being able to register and follow the rules in a way that makes sense, and also allows them to continue generating this income as middle class families?”

In Amsterdam, this is, like, a new step at trying to make it easier for hosts to know how to follow the law. When you have your 90 days is up, it’s a lot easier to say, like, “Okay, great. I’m not checking off the calendar by myself, but I’m able to do it using our own platform.”

David:  

One thing that has been real helpful for me here in San Francisco, as I’m a registered host, is Airbnb collecting and paying the TOT tax, the hotel tax, on my behalf. There’s no other platform that will do that, and it makes it very easy for me to comply with the city.

Emery: 

Yeah, and great that you say that. This developed, this tool, collect hotel taxes at no extra burden to local governments, and so to date, since we launched this tool, it’s helped us remit more than $110 million in new tax revenue in more than 200 jurisdictions around the world. Some cities are using these taxes to fund affordable housing or aid it, or use it to aid the homeless. It’s a pretty amazing, exciting thing to be generating so much extra tax money for these cities that they’re working on.

David:  

In theory, the hosts should be collecting that tax on their own and remitting it to the city, but in practice, that’s just normally not happening. Maybe a few hosts do, but the majority don’t probably, and they should.

Emery: 

But they should be.

David:  

Right. Speaking of ban, this episode, we usually talk about news in general, and there were bigger bans in place that … Executive orders with the president, and I know Brian Chesky and Airbnb kind of stepped in and made a statement around that. Can you talk a little bit about that?

Emery: 

It’s not my wheelhouse necessarily, but yes. Airbnb has committed to housing and helping many refugees around the world who are displaced, and Airbnb’s, as you all listeners know, our entire mission is about belonging anywhere and creating a world where anyone can belong, and we are in a place right now where there is an urgent need. People need to be housed, and because of the recent situation in the US … But way before that even than what happened this week, Airbnb has been working a lot with local non-profits to try to find housing for relief workers on the front lines. These humanitarian workers who travel and are, like, the very first to help out in an emergency disaster situation. We’ve been working way before 2017 to help those individuals, but now we’re taking it to the next level.

I can say personally, I’m, like, really proud to work at a company that has such a public commitment to doing that, and to saying, “We accept all people, no matter what your religious preference is, your race preference. We are here for everyone to feel that they belong, and not just to have a home, but to have someone welcome you into that home.”

David:  

I noticed the new hashtag. It changed from “belong anywhere” to “we accept” on the Superbowl commercial last night. That was a big deal, Airbnb having a Superbowl commercial. I feel like with both Airbnb’s commercial as well as some others, if they were aired a year ago, they might not have been that controversial, but not this year all these commercials are getting a lot of controversy around them, in light of the political climate. It’s funny how things can change. Did you see the commercial? The “we accept” commercial?

Emery: 

I did see the commercial.

David:  

Jasper, did you see that?

Jasper:

I actually saw it on the internet, right before we started recording. I did watch the Superbowl for the first time in my life, and I now understand what American football is about, and apparently it was a very historic match for several reasons. Yeah, I saw it on the internet. I thought it was a really cool little stab at Trump. You told me I wasn’t allowed to mention Trump anymore, so I’m actually glad you asked the question, David, so you can give me shit about that. But yeah, it’s an expensive time as well, isn’t it, to do a commercial, right?

David:  

Yeah. I heard they were going for about $5 million or so per 30 second ad, but I thought Airbnb one, that was one of my favorites. Very inclusive, and very much along the lines of the announcement that Brian Chesky made, and just Airbnb’s vision in general, so it was great to see them making a big stand on the big stage of the Superbowl.

Jasper: 

Absolutely. I totally agree. Awesome. Well, we’re running out of time unfortunately, because I feel like Emery could easily talk for another few hours about all this awesome stuff.

David:  

Love your enthusiasm.

Jasper: 

She has a lot of interesting things to say, so I’m definitely excited to maybe get her back on the show in the future. For now, I wanted to thank Emery again for taking the time. It’s been really interesting and awesome talking to you, and of course David, I want to thank you as well for asking some really intelligent questions that I would have never would have come up with, so thank you very much for that. Of course, thanks all the listeners for listening, and next week there will be another episode where we will be discussing the news of next week. Thanks for listening. David, go ahead.

David:  

Thank you, Jasper. One more time I just want to give Emery one more opportunity, if there’s anything final she wanted to say, and also just one more time where people should go if they want to have a new group.

Emery: 

Perfect. I want to say thank you so much for having me, and my final thought is, you know, I’m continuously inspired by the Airbnb host community to do good in their neighborhoods, and I think that Airbnb hosts are a different type of citizen in themselves, you know? They are someone who want to open up their cities and their homes to all types of travelers and explorers, and so I think it is a really … It’s been an amazing trip for me. Two and a half years here at Airbnb, being inspired by our hosts. I can’t wait to see all that we accomplish together as a global community in the next year.

I would say if you’re interested in learning more, interested in seeing if what your local club is doing, or interested in starting your own, you can go to www.Airbnb.com/Clubs. Also a great website to even learn more is www.AirbnbCitizen.com/Clubs. That has a lot of information, and see what these clubs are up to. Newsletters, blogs, photos, and more.

David:  

Awesome.

Jasper: 

Great, well thanks very much, and everybody who wants to get involved, go ahead and start your own club. Get involved, and take positive action, and help Airbnb dominate the world and make the world a better place. With that, thanks for listening and until next time.

 

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